About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CSPAN 20
CSPAN2 6
KPIX (CBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
CNNW 2
FBC 2
KGO (ABC) 2
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
CNBC 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
MSNBCW 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
every time i walked into the room because that would change the environment. i change the environment because i was always present but i didn't always want him to interact because i really wanted to document real moments and not change anything. so, that was my role. >> host: you write that it was magical whenever president bush and his father were together. there are a lot of photos of the two presidents bush in this book. >> guest: first of all they look so alike which is really interesting and anytime they were together it was like history in the making because you have two presidents together, father and son. the second son of the president to become president and it was always really interesting photographing them together as a family. they are so normal in lots of ways other than the fact that they are two presidents together. i really enjoyed documenting the family and the entire bush family. >> host: and did you get to know mrs. bush as well? >> guest: i did. >> host: i want to ask about this photo on a very very long couch. how did this come about? >> guest: this was inside t
seas caused by the current fiscal environment. yesterday in boston, the nation began to pay tribute and final respects to those killed in last week's senseless violence. the collective hearts of our coast guard family go out to the people of boston and all the families that have been harmed by this tragedy. but they also go out because the coast guard is a part of that community in boston, and we were able to respond immediately with boats and cruise and armed helicopter, vessel boarding teams and overall enhancement of maritime transportation security posture. our ability to respond like this, not only in boston, but in all our ports, is a direct result of the support that we've received from the congress and the administration over the last 12 years. the results of that support were also demonstrated during hurricane sandy when we rescued 14 crewmembers from the sailing ship h.m.s. bounty in 30-foot seas and 60 knot winds 80 miles offshore. we're also part of the community in new york and new jersey, so we were pleased to be able to get the port running again after the storm and w
the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
created a tense environment for many american muslims. while authorities have not released any information linking the alleged attack to religion, american muslims fear that the minds of some are already made up. >> it is a unique thing being a minority within the united states. it is not often like a when a white christian blows something up. and it is a fine line, there is a feeling of dread we're hoping they're not muslim. however, in the bay area we have some reports of hate incidents. fortunately, nothing has escalated to violence with people being confronted to that because of their apparent".their apparent religion." >> zarha goes on to say that muslims like herself, who are civil rights lawers, doctors and teachers are representatives of the larger american muslim community and what they want to contribute to the united states. >> the giants are not taking any chances at a-t-and- t park. for last night's ball game, once again they stepped up security precautions. although there were long lines, most fans were in good spirits and went with the flow. >> better safe than sorry. >> thi
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
for a few hours, and to institute a special targeting roles, both in the air environment and at the canadian import environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. again,spect to fema, when you saw the response in boston and how coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november boston held a mass of exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event, and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercises courted by the committee to fhrough fema, crease in our ability for response and resilience. we provided several intel products and briefings to law enforcement across the country, critical conner and operators, and we have been reaching out to community organizations who want to know what they can do. we are and lamenting security measures, both seen and unseen, at airports, transit hubs with in the maritime and run it, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is providing security on the ferries in the doing area, and teams are searches on terms of ground transportation and fell like. and finally, with respect to
the environment, but that would be a second step after you have someone in custody. the focus of the investigation changes from trying to identify a suspect or a location to actually looking to see if there's material which connects that particular item, in this case a knapsack, to an individual, with their clothing through fibers, or the environment with various dust particles there, whether it's pollen grains that put them in a particular location, the minerals that are present, or even chemicals from bomb-making. all these little particles stick around. what makes trace evidence so valuable is the fact that you can't see it, you're not aware of it, and there's almost no way to protect against it. >> greta: skip, thank you. >> you're welcome. >> greta: well, the pictures, the bags, the fibers and bombs, they are all giant potential clues. right now investigators are rebuilding the bombs from fragments. some are very small. the circuit board could also provide more information. kevin miles join us. kevin, why is the circuit board of any value in an investigation? >> the circuit board, if it's par
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
environment, but aided dramatically by all the video that has been made available. >> i think that's right. i think this is going to raise a debate long term in america like the debates we had on gun control in the wake of events that were so tragic in the past year or so. people are initially going to say, hey, look at the advantage you get in this 21st century environment where you have surveillance cameras everywhere. an environment that the europeans, by the way, are way ahead of us on. a lot more surveillance in europe than there is here. i suspect over the course of a month or two or three months americans will step back and say, hey, that might have aided that investigation but we're not sure we want to live in that kind of security culture. >> and we can't draw, phil, any hard conclusions about one of these bombs was in a pressure cooker. that's obviously available very easily. you can't draw any conclusions whether that's a signature of a domestic or a foreign terrorist. >> actually, i would draw conclusions. but more about what it's not than what it is. when you look at the people i
. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> this is ktvu channel 2 news at 5. >>> recapping our top stories, south bay authorities say the two attacks on utility systems appear to be a coordinated act of sabotage. sheriff's investigators say someone shot up the pg&e facility with a high-powered rifle yesterday. there are no suspects in either attack. but today at&t offered a $250,000 reward in the case. just minutes before 5 tonight, we got confirmation, the fbi has made an arrest in the ricin poison letter case happening on capitol hill. two letters tested positive for ricin, a toxic chemical. today federal law enforcement officials arrested a man in the mississippi area. the letters were intercepted before they reached the capitol building. >>> in boston, the police flatly denied reports that they've identified a suspect in monday's bombings. the federal courthouse in boston was evacuated for a time because of a bomb scare. there's now a bay area connection to the pressure cooker bombings used in the attacks. the batteries are manufactured at the
things in the environment and i will pound mail that goes to official facilities like capitol hill or white house. this person must have known that this mail could be intercepted but that doesn't absolve of the clumsy murder attempt. he did everything but put his address and fingerprints on envelope. the real risk is not necessarily organized plot or someone trying to perpetrate a terrorist the act but a lone mad scientist with diabolical intent with a apocalyptic vision who has the means to reengineer a virus or a bug. jenna: when we get that scenario, it brings us to the movies. what is the worst case scenario? when people ask you that what do you think is the case scenario when it comes to this substance? >> worst-case scenario, someone who is smart and ph.d scientist and knows how to work on genetic materials like the movie 12 monkeys. jenna: we're into speculation but not necessarily ricin or anthrax or something we know of? >> ricin is not a very potent killer. it is used in the past for targeted as nations but none on the list of 12 compounds the government says is major thr
concerned many of the new investments in the current congressional environment strike me as a very heavy lift. i have questions about the proposal to allow cbt to accept money from outside stakeholders. in particular, i would like to know how this proposal relates to plans for the uae. i am concerned that the department has yet again proposed to consolidate 16 targeted homeland security grant pot.ams into a single it has been years since consolidation was proposed and they have not articulated the existing grant programs and how they will be maintained. , we limited resources ensure that they are adequately funded. has two major, it initiatives. the immigratre ahe cycurity. -- youources that unique anticipated advances. >> opening statements may be submitted for the record. i would like to introduce the secretary. she is beginning her fifth year of service said one of the most important cabinet positions of the government. is asary napolitan siro governor and attorney general for the state of arizona. and she was also of the united states attorney. record,appear in the and i now recogniz
's going to be a lot of challenges running events in these open environments like a marathon. there's 26 miles, it's going to be very difficult, but there are a the will the of things that event organizers working wi ini law enforcement can do. >> dan, thank you so much. the boston red sox are doing their part to help their hometown heal. how they are bringing a sense of normalcy to the city. we'll head back live to fenway park in a few minutes. >>> welcome back to cnn's conning coverage of the terrorist attacks in boston. the city is beginning to return to normal and we can really get a sense of that at fenway park where the red sox are back in action today. before the first pitch, there was a solemn moment of silence. >> as we think of our 176 adults and children who were injured, including officer richard donahue, won't you join us as we observe a moment of silence, contemplation and prayer and in particular for the 58 who are still hospitalized. thank you. we wish each of you a speedy recovery. >> now let's go back to john berman a the ballpark. i'm wearing a red sox hat. i just want
. they stress no connection to the developments in boston. in this heightened environment and detective, patted rosen, it's curious. >> it done straits what we have known all along. they hate us and want to kill us they just keep coming at you. >> neil: even though there is not apparent link apparently this guy and these two brothers. you would argue the other day you think there are these kinds of cells where the two, three, four, five people all over the place. >> absolutely. they are unified. they are unified t the extent they hate us. they are absolutely bent on killing us. >> neil: is it a group, one was a chechen connection. there their common theme is they hate us. by that theory, they are everywhere. >> they appear to be a lot more than we have thought. it's safe to assume that the 19-year-old, who forgot surveillance cameras existed and boxer the chip the size of the arizona on his shoulder didn't orchestrate this in vacuum. there are too many moving parts to it. >> neil: local authorities say they did but there is no evidence that point to wider participation? >> i disagree with the f
for our country, this attack. whether or not we are living in an environment that looks more like israel and great britain under the ira where these sort of things happen and we become used to them. that is not a reality that any of us want to accept in this country. i wonder if the administration -- which side of this they will fall on. i think we will see from eric holder what their take is really on this when it comes down to the way it's prosecuted. any guthrie action to whether or not this -- gut reaction to whether or not this signals a change. >> reporter: i think they will say to try this american citizen through the normal civil courts, civilian criminal courts, and that may have a harder sell. i'm not saying that is not what is going to happen, i'm not saying that is not what the administration can do, but i think they need to make the case. remember at the height, martha, of the problems that the british had with terror attacks from the ira, they created a special set of courts named for a fabled british judge named lord diplock. they didn't use the formal process for certain
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
of that traffic. .t causes obviously delays it has an adverse impact on the environment as well. is to expand the american plaza, but also pursue span.bridges fan -- new yorket in buffalo, we southern ontario are -- need capacity. w want emphasize that we are trying to remove barriers to access, both physical and in tolls. when you look at the situation with the peace bridge, a lot of tolls are being used to support expansion of the plaza to promote traffic between the united states and canada. this is something that would be of concern. my sense is that it would be a new agency imposed toll compared to the ones that are already in place. help iniate all of your helping us address the issues and the peace bridge connecting buffalo and southern ontario in particular. i yield that. >> thank you. i turned to the gentleman from utah. thank youecretary, for your services. this is probably a long hearing. you do not know the line of questioning, so it requires you to be an expert on everything. things i would like to ask you quickly if i could. >> sure. >> as a former air force pilot, uncomfortabl
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
random metal and debris things picked up from the environment. all of that being pulled out of the bombing victims, bill. >> bill: tomorrow is going to be another emotional day. what are the plans as we understand them tonight, mike for the presidents visit at that church behind you? >> well, the president will come here to the cathedral of the holy cross just about 11:00. he will be accompanied by the first lady. it will be an interfaith service. the president is said to be delivering a message of shared pain not just with the people who were in the run itself or the people who live here in boston but the people -- the people in the run itself. and a shared sense of respect to the people who responded and saved lives. no word now if the president intends to visit with the victims and/or their families, bill. >> bill: mike, thanks. see you tomorrow. mike tobin from the church tonight. we are also hearing tonight from a hero by the name of tyler who helped comfort a young woman suffering shrapnel wounds from the terrorist attacks. yesterday the massachusetts governor devol pa
of the solution is simple, getting more officers on the streets. >> that rockridge is a target-rich environment. and with police response times not that great and with a shortage of police officers, crime is bound to go up. >> reporter: and the mayor's budget includes funding for additional police officers. and kalb says he would like to see a minimum of 800 from the current number of 640 in the next two years. and as for the shooting, the victim is expected to recover, and the gunman is still at large. a $5,000 reward is being offered for information leading to an arrest. live in oakland tonight, monte francis, nbc bay area news. >> thank you, monte. >>> in san lorenzo, homicide investigators are at the scene of a suspicious death. the victim is a woman in her 50s who was found at 3:00 this morning lying in a pool of blood in her driveway. a neighbor found her on silver leaf drive near east 14 street. a man who lives a few doors down told us everyone who lives in the neighborhood belongs to a homeowners association, and the area is regularly patrolled by security. the woman's name has not been
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
on the environment and wildlife. let's look at where the ban applies. these include grocery stores, convenience stores, pharmacies as well as other shops. the ban does not include restaurants food takeouts or bags used for produce, meat, bulk foods d prescription meds. we want to make note, if you don't have that reusable bag handy starting today here in those san mateo county cities, you will have to pay 10 cents for a paper bag and that fee is going up in 2015. it will go up to 25 cents per paper bag. so it's a good investment to make right now. live in menlo park, cate caugiran, kpix 5. >> by the end of the year, at least 17 cities in san mateo county will have implemented that plastic bag ban. >>> new this morning, it turns out a new waterfront development deal in oakland requires a substantial down payment from taxpayers. our own phil matier reports that to help swing the deal with chinese backing, oakland has agreed to spend about $25 million in unused redevelopment money. that money would be used to buy two parcels of land from the signature development group. >>> later today oakland sch
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] is it wrong to buy to match your mani-pedi? shop like a fashionista. not if you find something amazing for less than the price of it. save like a maxxinista. designer brands at t.j. prices. t.j.maxx. [ male announcer ] a car that can actually see like a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. ♪ the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. made the way you say at subwa. with our oven roasted chicken, now a $3 six-inch select. make it your own with melty monterey cheddar or creamy ranch. and during april, the black forest ham is also a $3 six-inch select. subway. eat fresh. >>> 7:23. if you're just joining us this morning, we are following the breaking news in the boston marathon bombing case. these are live pictures from watertown massachusetts. everyone in the boston area, they're being told stay home. stay indoors, don't go to school. don't go to workment don't open businesses. that's bec
. this is a report from environment energy news -- talk about the push back. guest: it is interesting that comes from this group. we were talking earlier about the impact -- host: between the majors and the independents? guest: exactly at would be the smaller companies that would feel the brunt of this if the tax code was adjusted. they put all drill that maxwell and there is fewer dollars, there will be less wells that were drilled. another argument they bring up -- we have discussed two tax preferences so far which are intangible drilling costs and percentage to live -- depletion and these are industries specific. they are only available to the oil and gas industry. the argument being made here is that they are similar to other tax preferences that exist in the tax code. that our = availabl to other industries outside of oil and gas. host: are the proposals on capitol hill to just target the major industries as opposed to these independent producers? guest: the president is targeting of the entire industry. certain pieces of legislation, notably from senator robert menendez from new jersey introduc
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] ♪ i -- i got it ♪ i got it made, i got it made ♪ i got it made ♪ i got it made fresh at subway® ♪ ♪ breakfast made the way i say ♪ i got it made, i got it made ♪ i got it made ♪ i got it made fresh at subway® ♪ ♪ breakfast made the way i say [ male announcer ] get breakfast made the way you say. like your very own sunrise subway melt™ with turkey, bacon and black forest ham. want chipotle southwest sauce, toasty flatbread? you so got it made. ♪ at subway® ♪ we didn't have u-verse back in my day. you couldn't just... guys... there you are. you know you couldn't just pause a show in one room, then... where was i... you couldn't pause a show in one room then start playing it in another. and...i'm talking to myself... [ male announcer ] call to get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for 2 years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. >> welcome back. it is 515. you are looking like a location of a press conference that just wrapped up. it was very short. the police came out and said basically the ent
in this environment or in that square. we have to check the integrity of the buildings. because of that the city is unable to release a time frame when the square will be reopened to the public, when people will come back to their businesses. jenna? jenna: more when we get it, mike. mike tobin live in boston today. jon: charges in connection with the boston terror attacks and the aftermath could come as early as today as investigators continue to look for answers. they want to know if dzhokhar tsarnaev and his brother acted alone. but his serious injuries are slowing their progress. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington right now. so what are we learning about the fbi's contact with the suspect, catherine? >> reporter: a leading republican briefed by the assistant director of the fbi last night tells fox news the risch shun equivalent of the fbi sent a letter to the bureau that they suspected older brother was a islamist extremist and believe in their cause. tamerlan tsarnaev travel oversees in 6 months, in 2012, that was not on the fbi radar that he misspelle
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
is that they see the light. the leaves of the iris are constantly monitoring light environment. they're actually may sewering how long the night is. >> reporter: it has nothing to do with summer. it is all about recognizing... >> the length of the day and the length of the night. >> reporter: this blooming iris was captured in time lapse video by film maker lewis swarsberg. the images show case the wonder of these plants. which can detect and respond to light even color. >> just like we can see red, blue and green, plants can see red, blue and even u.v. light. >> reporter: in some ways plants have a greater spectrum of light. >> they see more than we do. from a plant's point of view we're visually challenged. we only have four or five photo receptors, proteins that can see the light in our bodies. plants have like 13. >> they don't have sense organs in the way that we do. they don't have eyes or ears or noses, but they have receptors. and that's the level at which humans and plants are the same. >> reporter: amy litt is the director of plant-gemomics at the botanical garden. she explains that so
this is not an environment in which to address this. there are serious allegations of what they knew and did not know, and we'll have the benefit of hindsight. we are all monday morning quarterbacks on this, but because of his and issue intricately woven into legislation, we ought to let the dust settle, the emotions calm down before we address it. ashley: when you look at the root they took, everything was done legally. they went through the process, the younger brother became a citizen on 9/11 last year, the older brother held a green card, they filled out all the forms. what did the fbi now reportedly, allegedly i should say, knew they were tipped off the older brother, there was concerned about him. from an immigration point of view, some say they got through the cracks. tracy: fbi does not monitor immigrants. the fbi would only get involved with immigrant if there is credible allegation of criminal activity. it did not rise to the level of prosecution of credibility. they can only go forward with and do something with evidence when there is enough evidence to move forward with it did not exist at the ti
committee that it is an rook anymore-rich environment and mr. speaker, i'm an acronym challenged individual, so i'll be talking about the network and information technology research and development program. in the future i'll call it the program. it's the federal government's main research and development effort in unclassified networking, computing, software cybersecurity, and related information technology. research conducted under this program has led to scientific growth and innovation in several areas, including technologies in science, engineering, and medicine, computer-based education and training, and near real time weather forecasts which is really important in my state of wyoming. currently 15 federal agencies are contributing members to the program and even more participate. so h.r. 967, the bill in front of us, does two things. it updates the high performance computing act of 1991, and it re-authorizes the program to advance our nation's networking and information technology research and development. it's the digital age, mr. speaker. advances in networking and information tech
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american in a substrata of the chechen organization. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness of the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. it is a positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization. host: national
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
is deeply troubling in an increasingly restrictive environment of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration as foreign agents and also restrictions on press and internet freedom. we made clear with human dialogue but we remain committed to open dialogue with civil seent supporting their efforts. >> i do a follow-up on that? >> sure. >> in the past -- i think the u.s. government has talked a lot about their concern of human rights abuse in chechnya. i'm wondering if you think the events in boston are going to change the way the government would see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigation in boston, i have to reiterate the secretary's comment that it would be highly norptse to make comments at this time. i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting on russia since 1995. you will find quite a bit of information on this year's report and they note serious human rights abuses taking place and human rights violations committed by authorities and militants. >> this is going to be the last question. >> you m
. their concern is autonomy. there are actors within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american sentiments. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness of the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase community between -- communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization.
chemicals that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> row, row, row your boat. a live look there at crew. wow, they are really going this morning. yeah, it's going to be a warm day. find some water if you can. >> five snow boarders have died in what officials are calling colorado's deadliest avalanche in five decades. it happened yesterday afternoon near loveland pass about 50 miles west of denver. authorities say six snowboarders were on the almost 12,000 foot high pass when all of a sudden the snow gave way. >> they triggered a slide. at least one of them was able to bail off to the side and partially buried, but he was able to get himself out and call for help. >> authorities say the avalanche was about 600 feet wide and 8 feet deep. right now, authorities say the avalanche danger in colorado is at a 30 year high due to a lack of snow. >>> some people in the town of west, texas, are being allowed back into their homes for the first time since that deadly fertilizer explosion. a curfew is sti
out. and the work that brady has just been doing in the context of this environment that just refuses to budge is astonishing. but i think you're right. the people have got to move in order to make accountable. >> but you raise something about the obama thing that has to be talked about. >> yes. my folks are like do not let michael speak! there is not enough time! we are not done. stay with us. aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your good driving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. u ush. >>> maybe you heard that a mississippi resident was arrested for sending ricin laced letters to the president and a republican senator. perhaps you heard about the explosion in a fertilizer plant that killed 14 people. but it was genuinely difficult to get news on anything other than boston this week. and here are a few of the things
of rules that govern everyone, a set of rules that is designed to create an environment of law and order rather than one of chaos, and then make sure those rules are implemented in an even-handed fashion so as not to advantage any particular business at the expense of another. that is the best way government can support that, and when the government tries to go beyond that or promises to go beyond that, it usually ends up picking the winners and losers, and it becomes destructive to the free market economy and to the interest we're trying to achieve through the free market economy and a robust, free civil society. >> frances johnson, planning initiative. we have a challenge before us of gaining more of the general public or least a set of them who will see the wisdom we're talking about here, and then, if you will, support legislators and senators for congress who believe the same thing. now, a way to enlarge these people may be to start with the end game, tell some stories about particular people with names or surrogate names that have been benefited by the system, the father in jail wh
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)